8 TV Shows Which Effortlessly Represent Minorities - Cosmopolitan Sri Lanka

8 TV Shows Which Effortlessly Represent Minorities

Diverse picks for your viewing pleasure.

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Whether you learned to love yourself before entertainment gave you inclusion, or you’re growing up with your pride following you around on billboards, this side of television promises that your humanity is not only defined by social constructs.

THE GOOD PLACE

The Good Place is an American sitcom focused on the subsequent friendship of four individuals as they navigate through an afterlife version of “Heaven”. With a solid storyline, diverse leads, and refined humour, this show truly shines by making representation secondary to themes of morality, ethics, death, and the redemption of mankind. 

BROOKLYN NINE NINE 

Following the comedic genius of Dan Goor and Michael Schur, Brooklyn’s 99th police precinct follows a complex tale of humour, crime, friendship, race, food, love, gender, and sexuality. Join the inner circle, as they discuss vulnerability, discrimination, the art of seduction (shampooing your lovers hair, courtesy of Charles Boyle), Captain Holt impersonating a ‘straight man’, Jake’s dad leaving his mom, and Die Hard.

FRESH OFF THE BOAT 

As an Asian-American family relocates to a mostly white neighborhood in Orlando, the pilot of Fresh Off The Boat, sets the premise for the future of sitcoms. It tackles a merging of new and old stereotypes (regarding culture and race), well defined characters, a restraining order from Stephen King, quirky humour, and an insider’s guide to being treated like an “outsider”.

 JANE THE VIRGIN

Written as an ode to telenovelas (Spanish soap operas), a 23-year-old virgin finds out that she has been accidentally artificially inseminated, and is now pregnant with the child of her boss, Rafael Solano. Layered with love triangles, murder, drug lords, religion, wealth, telenovela stars, and three generations of supportive Villanueva women, Jane The Virgin has served as an electrifying five season marathon with equal parts drama and reality.

ONE DAY AT A TIME 

As Penelope Alvarez navigates through the next phase of her life, as a single mother and a civilian with PTSD, One Day At A Time tugs the audience towards and beyond her, hoping to catch more than just glimpses of a daughter struggling with her sexuality, a son experimenting with drugs, a mother lamenting for Cuba, and a landlord battling with addiction. 

ON MY BLOCK 

As four best friends from a rough Hispanic and African American neighborhood enter high school, their bonds are tested by gang affiliations, the cruelties of commonplace violence, underage sex, and the ‘normal’ triumphs and tribulations associated with adolescence. On My Block is a truth for many, supporting the few who survived and succeeded against their backgrounds, while mourning the ones who lost and succumbed. 

CABLE GIRLS 

Following the intertwining journeys of four ‘Cable Girls’ at a national telephone company, in the 1920’s, Madrid, this Spanish drama follows the slow progression of women’s rights, the melding of past and future, deception, sexuality, crime, and sisterhood. With an aesthetically pleasing wardrobe, bold lipstick, and an exciting clash of modern music against a historical backdrop,

Cable Girls stuns the audience into a ruthless binge haze.

AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.

When Marvel’s underdogs received their own show, one could not help but be skeptical of it succeeding. Oh, the joy of being proven wrong! Entering their sixth season this month, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. has been no stranger to intriguing storylines and comfortable representation — including two strong Asian female leads, one Latina with robotic arms, and an African American engineer turned “Director of S.H.I.E.L.D.”— refusing to acknowledge the progressive significance of its cast, in a successful attempt to normalize their onscreen presences.

 

 

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